• Introduction to Native Peoples
    900,692
  • Price: 10,500.00 
    Edition Size is 35
    Dimension:  30 x 24 x 24 inches - 70 lbs.


       Since the very origins of human consciousness, there is evidence that humans understood the concept of future, and sought to influence it to improve their chances of survival.   Using animal helping spirits to carry prayers and messages to the highest power is a practice found in every culture throughout time.  The intervention of holy men/shamans/medicine men to enhance spiritual connection is a tradition practiced by cultures worldwide as a very sacred ritual.  Summoning these spirits in times of crisis (whether in healing, hunting, battle, etc. ) to carry prayers to the highest deity was seen as a matter of life and death.

       I chose to create a holy man based on what I have been most familiar…..a Native American from my own continent.  The Oglala Sioux medicine men were the subjects of several historical books about Black Elk and Crazy Horse that influenced me decades ago, so I selected this tribe. 

    This seemed like the right sculpture to express my feelings about the significance of seers and wisdom keepers through my art. To me, in an era when we are facing global environmental concerns and are not so in tune with the natural world, it is prudent to recall how mankind has traditionally handled overwhelming challenges.

       In this sculpture, this holy man is in a prayer trance, using chanting, drumming, and wafting the smoke of burning sage over himself, by using his eagle prayer fan, in order to reach the state of consciousness that puts him in touch with helping spirits.   In this altered state, he can appeal to these helpers and divine powers for aid in facing troubled times.

    Photo Credit Wendy McEahern

    Prayer Chant
    900,1209
  • Price: 65,000.00
    Edition Size is 25
    Dimension:  50 x 40 x 52 inches - 373 lbs.

    “Prayer Chant”

    Since the very origins of human consciousness, there is evidence that humans understood the concept of future, and sought to influence it to improve their chances of survival.   Using animal helping spirits to carry prayers and messages to the highest power is a practice found in every culture throughout time.  The intervention of holy men/shamans/medicine men to enhance spiritual connection is a tradition practiced by cultures worldwide as a very sacred ritual.  Summoning these spirits in times of crisis (whether in healing, hunting, battle, etc. ) to carry prayers to the highest deity was seen as a matter of life and death.

       I chose to create a holy man based on what I have been most familiar…..a Native American from my own continent.  The Oglala Sioux medicine men were the subjects of several historical books about Black Elk and Crazy Horse that influenced me decades ago, so I selected this tribe. 

    This seemed like the right sculpture to express my feelings about the significance of seers and wisdom keepers through my art.  To me, in an era when we are facing global environmental concerns and are not so in tune with the natural world, it is prudent to recall how mankind has traditionally handled overwhelming challenges.

       In this sculpture, this holy man is in a prayer trance, using chanting, drumming, and wafting the smoke of burning sage over himself, by using his eagle prayer fan, in order to reach the state of consciousness that puts him in touch with helping spirits.   In this altered state, he can appeal to these helpers and divine powers for aid in facing troubled times.



    Prayer Chant (life size and one quarter)
    900,1254
  • 900,1287
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,900.0

    Dimensions

    H 20in x W 15in x D 15in

    Weight 30lbs

     

    The Ballad of Kokopelli
    A strange lonely figure stares out of the past
    where engraved by an artist in stone
    Held firm by the sand in which he is cast,
    these last thousand years quite alone.
    Could he be listening, trying to hear
    moccasins scuffing the butte?
    Bringing the people once again near
    to hear Kokopelli's sweet flute?
    His image inscribed on a thousand rock faces
    from east to the great western sea;
    From Sonora's hot sun to the north glaciers bases,
    proclaiming this loved tutelary.
    Though powers possessed and methods employed
    are often in open dispute;
    One thing is agreed, the people did love
    to hear Kokopelli's sweet flute.
    This stick figure man, with a hump on his back
    seemed always to cast a good feeling;
    His magic perhaps, taken out of his pack
    would comfort the sick and do healing.
    Whatever his talents, they surely were grand,
    a fact no one cares to refute,
    As people would come from afar in the land,
    to hear Kokopelli's sweet flute.


    Glenn Welker, Indigenous
    Peoples’ Literature

     

     Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Star York may reproduce as needed for advertising, web and self promotion, for an unlimited time period. All use must be accompanied by photo credit © Wendy McEahern Photography. Third party use by permission of Wendy McEahern ONLY and subject to licensing fees. ALL OTHER RIGHTS RESERVED

    Kokopelli
    480,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 8,500.00

     

    Dimensions
    H 24in x W 22in x D 22in

    Weight 86lbs

     

     

    "Maria Martinez: The Art Spirit"
    This is a portrait of the pueblo potter, Maria Martinez (1887-1980), which I was asked to sculpt by the Millicent Rogers Museum in Taos, NM.  Maria's gloss black on matt black pots are internationally known, and she is given credit for helping Native American creations to be taken seriously as fine art.   Millicent Rogers had collected many of her finest examples, and the first sculpture in this edition now resides in the museum's "Maria Martinez" exhibition hall.  I wanted to capture an expression that gives us a glimpse of her delight in creative process....a reflection of the "art spirit".

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Maria Martinez: The Art Spirit
    480,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 7,800.00


    Dimensions
    H 28in x W 20in x D 20in

    Weight 85lbs

     

     This sculpture is intended for the 9 ft monument to be installed at the Oklahoma State Capital Park in Oklahoma City.  The plan is to create a park lined with historical figures from Oklahoma's past.  The first chosen to be sculpted was Te Ata, a Chickasaw/Choctaw woman who was an actress in the first half of the 20th century. She developed a play based on the life of her family and ancestors, intertwined with Oklahoma history.  The show was so popular she performed all over the world, often for kings & queens of many different countries.  She became an honored ambassador of our country's culture, basing her stage play on the oral tradition of storytelling.

     

    Photo Credit Wendy McEahern

    Te Ata
    474,714
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 6,000

    Dimensions:

    H 30in x W 9in x D 8in

    Weight 45 Lbs. 

     

    From the earliest hunter-gatherers to the complex tribal clans that still exist in parts of the world today, one can observe evidence of people deeply involved in the maintenance of a beneficient relationship with Animal Spirits.  Essential to this is the intervention of the shaman, or medicine man, who acts as the intermediary between the physical world and the mysterious universe of the supernatural.  This shaman from the Sioux tribe derives his powerful medicine from Elk, which is the most sexually potent symbol in Sioux imagery; but he is supported by different animal helpers which are represented by coyote and ferret skins, hawk feathers, and many claws and herbs wrapped around his medicine hoop.  A mask of softened elk hide silences his worldly self (shamans literally cannot speak when masked) so that the animal's essence emerges during the rituals.

    This costume - of an Elk Dreamer - was particularly fascinating to me because it strongly resembles the paintings of shamans found in the ancient rock paintings in Europe - confirming further the universality of the desire and attempt to achieve a spiritual connection with Animal Spirits.

    Photo Credit Underexposed

    Elk Dreamer
    480,720
  • Bronze Edition of 15.

    Price $ 84,000

     

    Dimensions:

    H 74in x W 55in x D 45in

    Weight 375lbs

     

         In the desert, as in the mountains, the weather can be violently unpredictable.  Storms can explode out of a serene blue sky in a matter of moments.  For this reason, Native People, who spent most of their time out-of-doors, were acutely attuned to the warning signs.  Drawing on these facts of nature, Star York has imagined a dramatic vignette of turn-of-the-century Apache life.  A young mother out gathering berries with her child has heard the drums of distant thunder.  Pursued by a lashing wind and bolts of lightning, she hurries toward shelter. 

        As with all of Star's work, the historical detail is finely researched.  The "burden basket" the woman carries over her shoulder is specific to western tribes and is given to young girls at their puberty ceremonies.  Note the jewelry the woman is wearing: in addition to the cross, silver-dollar medallion, and glass trade bead necklace, around her neck dangles a wood amulet carved by a medicine man out of lightning-struck wood that is believed to be an entrail of the Wind God.

         But the detail does not exist for detail's sake - it is integrated into the sculpture in ways that subtly support the original concept.  The way the woman is dressed is an example.  Rather than putting her in traditional clothes, Star has her wearing the kind of long and loose cotton dress Western Apache women adopted after contact with Europeans.  This allows Star to bring more movement to the piece, accenting the woman's flight and the swirling wind, which in turn adds drama and urgency to the action.
         Finally, look closely at the baby.  Intuitively he appears to have recognized his mother's alarm.  He seems to know danger is chasing them.  And we realize this not only by the wild-eyed expression registered on his face, but by the suggestion that he too has acted in rescuing his doll.
         In this exciting new work, Star continues her interest in sculpting Indian women and placing them in contexts that allow them to demonstrate strength and character.  Though concern is etched in this young Apache mother's brow, she acts swiftly and competently to stay ahead of trouble.

     

    Photo credit Pam Taylor

    Distant Thunder
    479,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    New Price $ 25,000.00

     

    Dimensions

    H 55in x W 24in x D 23in

    Weight 190lbs

     

    Corn pollen is still a sacred part of ritual blessings and prayers in many Native American cultures.  This tradition is the inspiration behind "Touch the Earth".  In some tribes particularly the Navajo, pollen is used for blessing the most simple act, person or place, as well as in the most elaborate ceremonies.  The power of the pollen is considered greatly enhanced by dusting the wings of an eagle or hawk, captured for such purposes.  The bird, placed over a buckskin, will shake off the pollen, which is then carefully gathered from the buckskin, and kept in a pollen pouch for future use in blessings and prayers.

     

    In "Touch the Earth", the woman is using the pollen for a prayer.  The hawk suggests the strength of the pollen's power, and she is barefoot, touching the earth to further open the channel between herself and the spirit world

    Touch the Earth
    394,720
  • Edition Size: 35
    Price 4,800.00
    Dimensions: H 25.5" x W 11.5" x D 9.5"
    Weight 25 lbs


    Corn pollen is still a sacred part of ritual blessings and prayers in many Native American cultures.  This tradition is the inspiration behind "Touch the Earth".  In some tribes particularly the Navajo, pollen is used for blessing the most simple act, person or place, as well as in the most elaborate ceremonies.  The power of the pollen is considered greatly enhanced by dusting the wings of an eagle or hawk, captured for such purposes.  The bird, placed over a buckskin, will shake off the pollen, which is then carefully gathered from the buckskin, and kept in a pollen pouch for future use in blessings and prayers.

     

    In "Touch the Earth", the woman is using the pollen for a prayer.  The hawk suggests the strength of the pollen's power, and she is barefoot, touching the earth to further open the channel between herself and the spirit world



     
    Star York may reproduce as needed for advertising, web and self promotion, for an unlimited time period. All use must be accompanied by photo credit © Wendy McEahern. Third party use by permission of Wendy McEahern ONLY and subject to licensing fees. ALL OTHER RIGHTS RESERVED
    Touch the Earth (maquette)
    900,1350
  • Bronze Edition of 15.

    Price $ 44,000

     

    Dimensions:

    H 64in x W 20in x D 24in

    Weight 300lbs

     

     This woman, wrapped in a blanket either because of a slight chill after undressing for a bath, or out of modesty despite the implied private setting, tests the water delicately with her toe in anticipation of a refreshing bath.

     

    Does the title refer to the source of water for this bath?  A private sanctuary she alone knows of and is therefore untouched?  The reference could point to the woman herself in the springtime of her life; new to womanhood, virgin in her coming of age.  It connotes a private moment when the woman is lost in sensations. 

     

    Absentmindedly she fingers her necklace, distracted by how things feel, smell, and sound.  The cool air on her bare skin, the prickly rough woven wool, the woodsy scents of dew on leaves and grass and fallen trees, the gurgling spring, chatter of birds, rustle of leaves stirred by a faint breeze.  When we feel new we become aware of even minute sensations.

     

    Perhaps she has risen from intimacy with her lover (she wears a chief’s blanket) and is feeling reborn in her discovery of herself as a woman.  She contemplates descending in to the clear cleansing pool, a ritual we associate with rebirth, and reflects the pure contentment of the moment on her placid face.

    Virgin Spring
    466,798
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 8,200

     

    Dimensions:

    H 17in x W 12in x D 13in

    Weight 49lbs

     

     This woman, wrapped in a blanket either because of a slight chill after undressing for a bath, or out of modesty despite the implied private setting, tests the water delicately with her toe in anticipation of a refreshing bath.

     

    Does the title refer to the source of water for this bath?  A private sanctuary she alone knows of and is therefore untouched?  The reference could point to the woman herself in the springtime of her life; new to womanhood, virgin in her coming of age.  It connotes a private moment when the woman is lost in sensations. 

     

    Absentmindedly she fingers her necklace, distracted by how things feel, smell, and sound.  The cool air on her bare skin, the prickly rough woven wool, the woodsy scents of dew on leaves and grass and fallen trees, the gurgling spring, chatter of birds, rustle of leaves stirred by a faint breeze.  When we feel new we become aware of even minute sensations.

     

    Perhaps she has risen from intimacy with her lover (she wears a chief’s blanket) and is feeling reborn in her discovery of herself as a woman.  She contemplates descending in to the clear cleansing pool, a ritual we associate with rebirth, and reflects the pure contentment of the moment on her placid face.

    Virgin Spring (maquette)
    900,1098
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 8,000

     

    Dimensions:

    H 23in x W 16in x D 18in

    Weight 56lbs

     

    In Rose in Bloom depicts a young Navajo woman celebrating a moment.  Dressed in her traditional skirt, shawl and moccasins, and adorned in jewelry crafted by artisans in her tribe, she is feeling beautiful.  She lifts and flutters her skirt in a twirl as she celebrates her femininity.  She is excited but as indicative in her Navajo culture, she is also shy and hesitant in her self-expression.  Like the rose in her hair, she is In Full Bloom.  She is beginning her journey into Womanhood. 

    Despite many tensions over the years there is a great deal of Spanish influence in Navajo culture.  The rose in her hair signifies a nod of appreciation to those Spanish influences, some of which include the introduction of sheep which led to the creation of Navajo weaving and the art of silver-smithing.

     

     

    Photo by John Guernsey


    Rose in Bloom
    551,720
  •  

    Bronze Edition of 15.

    Price $ 37,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 48in x W 18in x D 22in without rock base

    Weight 170 lbs


     

    "Water Song" features a young Anasazi woman sitting on a rock washing her hair.  In this piece, Star wanted to capture those quiet, reflective moments that women frequently enjoy while performing the daily rituals of self-maintenance. 

               

    "These routines, such as brushing your hair or bathing, give us private time when we can escape into thoughts that take us faraway from daily cares," she says.  "Whether fantasizing about a dream lover or composing the lyrics to a personal song, these private moments, I believe have always been precious to women."

     

    The life-size "Water Song" is mounted on a faux stone model of an actual boulder.  Although modifications can be made to accommodate specific sites, the way in which the piece is currently designed allows the sculpture and the stone to sit in a pool of water.  A submerged pump pushes a stream of water through plumbing already installed within the sculpture, which is emitted through an opening in her hair where her hands appear to be wringing water into a bowl.  As the bowl fills with water (as if she is so lost in her thoughts she doesn't realize what is happening in front of her) the water spills over, dropping into a natural cup in the rock, and in turn overflowing into the pool where it is re-circulated by the pump.

     

    The sound of trickling water scores her meditations like a musical background - thus the title "Water Song".

    Water Song
    462,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 5,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 25in x W 12in x D 8in

    Weight 40 lbs

     

    "There is more to sculpting Native faces than high cheekbones," Star has said.  "To do it successfully, you must create a sense of inner character.  The piece must have an expression that reflects the way that person thinks of himself, and his place in the universe." 

     

    Star's sculpture - "Pinto Begay" - is a good illustration of this approach.  He is a Navajo medicine man bedecked in jewelry he has received in payment for his healing talents.  But his posture and stance, with a hint of swagger, remind us that stature has little to do with size.  And his gaze radiates the confidence of someone in possession of extraordinary powers.

    Pinto Begay
    501,684
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 7,200

    Dimensions:
    H 21in x W 17in x D 18in

    Weight 65 lb.

     


    Storytelling has always played an important role among Native Peoples.
      The storyteller is at the very center of any given culture, conveying important messages about history and identity.  Values, such as respect for the natural world, love for elders and children, and the importance of family were passed along through stories.  Oral narrative has been important to most cultures throughout the ages, but the Navajo have long, detailed cycles of stories that are still remembered by a few remaining elders even today. 

     

    After attending some storytelling gatherings in Santa Fe and Albuquerque, Star decided the subject matter could offer a vehicle for depth of expression and meaning.  Storytellers are performers, using a gesture of body and face to enhance appreciation of a story and stimulate the imagination of their listeners . . . when done well, it is a true art form, conveying through entertainment, key attitudes and morals of a culture.

     

    In this sculpture, a Navajo Grandfather is telling one of the many legends of the eagle . . . that regal bird being an important symbol in many Native American cultures.  His hands describe the bird's ascension and one can easily imagine the scene as his listeners gather around the fire and the shadow of his hands cast against the hogan wall brings the bird to life for his audience in the dancing firelight.

     

     

     

     

    Storyteller, a time before leaves
    472,705
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 14,000.00

     

    Dimensions
    H 24in x W 24in x D 24in

    Weight 110lbs

     

    The elders of all cultures are the wisdom keepers… those that can pass down invaluable lessons thru stories, legends, and example.  Whether seen as gifts of the dolls, or gifts of her stories that pass the legacy of their people to the younger generation. The essence of this sculpture is the value of this giving relationship between grandmother and child.

    In Pueblo cultures of the Southwest, such elders instill a sense of virtue, self worth, and tribal pride thru stories involving deities called Kachina’s. These Kachinas play a crucial role in the survival and spirituality of the people. Kachina dolls are given to young girls to help teach them the significance of various deities. Here the “mudheads”, the “koshare”, and the kachina “mother” and “maiden” represent the traditional tribal dolls. To acknowledge the outside influences in today’s Pueblo cultures, a teddy bear and sock monkey join the audience that listen with the granddaughter to ancient legends.

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Granma's Gifts
    591,720
  • Bronze Edition of 45.

    Price $ 4,800

     

    Dimensions:
    H 17.5in x W 15in x D 15in

    Weight 60lbs

     

    An ethereal tapestry in sand, the dry sand painting calls forth the divine gifts of healing.  A sick child seated in the magic circle absorbs the power from the intricate designs representing the holy people.

     

    A medicine man will work for hours with helpers to create the design, trickling crushed sandstone pollen or charcoal taken from a tree struck by lightning and by the time the sun goes down the sand painting must be obliterated lest evil spirits of the night make mischief with the symbols.

     

    A patient's family will host a "sing" and hundreds of Navajo will gather to share the blessings.  The principle is that the mind and body are one and that the patient, not the illness, is treated.  The ritual brings the patient back into harmony with himself and the world.

    Healing Circle
    722,684
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 5,500

     

    Dimensions:

    H 17in x W 15in x D 15in

    Weight 35lbs

     


     In many native cultures children are given, at a very early age, young animals to care for. 

    This not only helps out the household in learning to take over a chore, but most importantly teaches the child to nurture, and the rewards of caring for another being more helpless than oneself.  This little girl has been given a baby goat to care for, and has taken her responsibility to heart . . . rocking thee goat and singing to it tenderly.

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Lilly's Lullaby
    900,1139
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,200

     

    Dimensions:
    H 15.5in x W 7in x D 6in

    Weight 12lbs

     

     A custom practiced by some Plains Indian tribes was fashioning a leather wrapped circle and tying string through its middle in the pattern of a spider web.  An opening was left in the center of the web to which was attached various good luck charms.  Fastening the talisman to the head of a cradleboard allowed the child’s good dreams to pass through the web’s hole, trapping the malevolent forces in the web.

     

    The Apache woman has traded for the talisman – called a Dreamcatcher – and views it in wonder and hope for her young child’s future . . .determined to give the child every advantage – using magic and mysticism to insure the child’s well being.

     

    Photo Credit Wendy McEahern

    Dreamcatcher (sm)
    480,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 7,800

     

    Dimensions:
    H 28in x W 16in x D 16in

    Weight 70lbs

     

    “ Fabric of Life” Suite


     

    The suite consists of four sculptures that reflect the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  Each represents a stage in the creation of a wool weaving. . . . from the raising of the sheep to the blanket’s use. Interwoven is the life of a Navajo woman, going from child, mother,  grandmother and finally elder, I will call her Nizhoni.

     

    “Spring”

    In this first sculpture Nizhoni learns to care for and nurture the sheep and their lambs.  From this responsibility comes an understanding of the rhythms of nature. Even today Navajo children raised in the cities are often returned to the reservation to live with and learn from the grandparents for a period of time. Having the experience of their traditional old ways that are the backbone of their culture can give them a strong foundation for life.  Tending sheep is a valuable chore to the family that is part of this education.  This is the beginning of the young girl’s life, as it is the necessary beginning stage of the creation of the wool for  weaving.

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Fabric of Life, Spring
    480,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 6,600

     

    Dimensions:
    H 13n x W 15in x D 12.5in

    Weight 50lbs

     

    “ Fabric of Life” Suite


     

    The suite consists of four sculptures that reflect the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  Each represents a stage in the creation of a wool weaving. . . . from the raising of the sheep to the blanket’s use. Interwoven is the life of a Navajo woman, going from child, mother,  grandmother and finally elder, I will call her Nizhoni.

    “Summer Spinning”

    Part of the process of turning wool into weavable yarn is drawing out the “carded” wool after shearing the sheep into thinner, finer thread.  It requires pulling the wool thru fingers with a twirling motion as it is wound onto a spindle.  Nizhoni has become a young mother who teaches her own daughters by example as her mother showed her and her mother did her, going back generations.  Before weaving into intricate patterns, the yarn may be dyed with natural pigments.  These patterns are developed from a sense of aesthetic influenced by the dramatic beauty of the surrounding desert environment.  The symbols used also reflect their beliefs & myths.  Often the design may tell a story of either the tribe or family history that also incorporates their cultural values.  So, not only does this mother pass along the skill of creating yarn and weaving fabric, but also she teaches the symbology of their culture. 

     

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Fabric of Life, Summer Spinning
    478,553
  • Bronze Edition of 35

    Price: $8,500.00

    Dimensions:

    H 28in x W 20in x D 18in

    Weight 80 lbs

     

    " Fabric of Life" Suite

    The suite consists of four sculptures that reflect the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter. Each represents a stage in the creation of a wool weaving. . . . from the raising of the sheep to the blanket's use. Interwoven is the life of a Navajo woman, going from child, mother, grandmother and finally elder, I will call her Nizhoni.

    Autumn

    Nizhoni has become a woman of seasoned maturity and presents her finished creation with great satisfaction. A grand-mother now, her many decades of weaving and living bring together her practiced skill with a depth of understanding that can only come over time.

    She holds the finished blanket proudly. It represents many years of honing her skill as a weaver and as an artist. The weaving is her artistic medium thru which she interprets her culture and world. She has accomplished a point in her life when all elements that make up who she is and what she knows of life come together in this woven creation. It will not go to market, but will remain in her family as a testament to her life. . . .an heirloom for her following generations.

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

     

     

     

     

     

    Star York may reproduce as needed for self promotional purposes. Any third party use with photographers permission only. Photo credit must acompany all use.

    Autumn Harvest
    260,339
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 8,800

     

    Dimensions:
    H 23.5n x W 14in x D 11in

    Weight 65lbs


    “ Fabric of Life” Suite
     


     The suite consists of four sculptures that reflect the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  Each represents a stage in the creation of a wool weaving. . . . from the raising of the sheep to the blanket’s use. Interwoven is the life of a Navajo woman, going from child, mother,  grandmother and finally elder, I will call her Nizhoni.

     

    Winter

    Nizhoni, with her husband, has reached elder status, and together they walked thru the golden years of their full lives.  He wraps the beloved blanket over her… the weaving she finished with such pride so many years ago.  In their faces are the lines that tell the story of lives well lived.  Shared was much love and laughter, despite hardships, and they now face their last years with peace and contentment.  The weaving warms them, shelters them, and connects them. . . .an art piece from her heart and hands; an integral part of who they are and the life they’ve shared.

     

    “ We are strands on a weaving, woven by the sun, threaded by the moon, designed by the dreams of the stars”

                                                                            -Anonymous

     

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Fabric of Life, Winter Warmth
    600,900
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 11,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 25.5n x W 25in x D 10in

    Weight 120lbs

     

     

    “ Fabric of Life” Suite


     The suite consists of four sculptures that reflect the four seasons: Spring, Summer, Fall and Winter.  Each represents a stage in the creation of a wool weaving. . . . from the raising of the sheep to the blanket’s use. Interwoven is the life of a Navajo woman, going from child, mother,  grandmother and finally elder, I will call her Nizhoni.

     

    "To Market"

     

    A mature woman and weaving artist at this stage of her life, Nizhoni travels to market with the weavings of her family.

    She is a mother with her own grown daughter now, and she proudly carries the precious cargo of three generations: her mother's, her daughter's and her own....blankets woven from their own hands with skill, care, and love.

     

     

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Fabric of Life, To Market
    704,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 9,200

     

    Dimensions:
    H 38in x W 14in x D 14in

    Weight 120lbs


    In a recent interview with a freelance arts writer, Star said, "I don't work from models.  Often I don't even have an image in mind of what the figure is supposed to look like when I start.  The process has more to do with a peripheral vision, and recognizing and eliminating what's wrong to get at what's right." 


    Before she began sculpting this piece, Star had been thinking about the situation confronting many Indian people today regarding their place in the modern world, and how that connects to their participation in rituals honoring traditional beliefs.  "Cloud Dancer" was the result.

    There is a chill in the morning air at San Juan Pueblo, where the Cloud Dance, which is usually held in early spring because of its associations with agriculture, weather control and fertility, is about to begin.  The women who will perform, some having thrown a blanket over their shoulders to stay warm, all wearing elaborate headdresses made of twelve eagle feathers in a fan on top of their heads and carrying ears of corn, slowly make their way toward the plaza where the male dancers are waiting.  In that contemplative moment this young Pueblo woman takes the opportunity to reflect on the contentedness that follows from participation in an activity that will reinforce her sense of tribal belonging.  In the serene expression that Star has given her, a wholeness radiates from within that is derived from having found a balance between past and present in her life.
     

     

    Cloud Dancer
    347,576
  • Edition Size 35

    Price: $3000.00

     

    Dimensions:  21 x 10 x 5"

    Weight 20lbs

     

    Still an important part of the ceremony and traditional Pueblo culture, the Koshare clowns amuse, tease and delight . . . their antics designed to teach while making fun. This Koshare mimics the self important, reminding u s not to take ourselves too seriously.

    Mr. Big Stuff
    567,1090
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price 9,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 20in x W 12in x D 16in

    Weight 40lbs


    Wintertime was storytelling time for the Navajo.  In the evenings the children would eagerly gather around the fire in the hogan to listen to their grandparents relate tribal legends.  Frequently the elders would illustrate figures in the tales with designs made from a piece of string.  In this sculpture a grandmother is telling the tale of how the Navajo gods of creation made the stars as she begins to shape a star design out of a cat's cradle. 


    According to Navajo mythology, when the other gods asked Black God to fill the dark night sky with stars to make it beautiful, he took a single bright crystal from a fawn-skin pouch and placed it precisely in the north.  It became North Fire, the star that never moves, which guides the nighttime traveler.  Next he placed other stars in patterns that formed the constellations.  It was left to the supernatural spirit Spider Woman to teach the Dineh (Navajo for The People) the relationship of the stellar configurations to nature.  From her they learned that by observing how the positions of the stars changed through the seasons they would know when to plant and when to harvest.

    Spring games were a popular form of amusement for the Navajo - but only in the months between October and April ("when the Spider People are at rest", says Navajo lore).  Many a winter evening was pleasantly passed with a grandmother teaching her grandchildren the lessons of Spider Woman.

    Lessons of Spider Woman
    515,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 13.5in x W 7.5in x D 3.5in

    Weight 20lbs


    This Pueblo woman is preparing for a “feast day”, a day of ceremony and much feasting at one another’s homes . . . a tradition that seals family and tribal ties.
      She has the confidence and gentleness of a matriarch comfortable in herself and her world. 

    Photo credit Wendy McEahern

    Feast Day
    568,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 6,600

     

    Dimensions:
    H 23in x W 19in x D 19in

    Weight 65lbs


     My intention in this sculpture was to capture an interesting and rich moment of intersection between the traditional American Indian and the modern European culture, circa mid-19th century.  One that works in highly personal and individual terms, and one that also has a larger resonance. 

     

    On the literal level I have sculpted a young Mojave woman who is pausing in the act of painting her face prior to a ceremony to contemplate her reflection in a mirror obtained from a white trader.  Though her thoughts are private, the possibilities are endless.  Looking at herself she could be recognizing her mother's face.  Or she could be trying to consider her appearance as others see it to better understand why people react the way they do.  Perhaps, applying face paint, she has even seen "cosmetic" possibilities.  Whatever, it is through the white man's looking glass that she has entered a state of self-awareness that is new and intriguing to her.

     

    On the larger level, contact with Europeans forced a cultural self-awareness among the Indian people inhabiting this continent that had not existed previously.  The name many tribes gave themselves translated as "the People".  The word for "others" often translated as "the Enemy".  One result of that contact was to raise questions about the meaning of identity - questions that continue to haunt Native Peoples to this day.

    The Looking Glass
    594,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 10,000.00

     

    Dimensions:
    H 26in x W 17in x D 13in

    Weight 60lbs


     This woman, wrapped in a blanket either because of a slight chill after undressing for a bath, or out of modesty despite the implied private setting, serenely watches the water in anticipation of a refreshing bath. 

     

    Absentmindedly she fingers her necklace, distracted by how things feel, smell, and sound.  The cool air on her bare skin, the prickly rough woven wool, the woodsy scents of dew on leaves and grass and fallen trees, the gurgling spring, chatter of birds, rustle of leaves stirred by a faint breeze.  When we feel new we become aware of even minute sensations.

     

    Perhaps she has risen from intimacy with her lover (she wears a chief’s blanket) and is feeling reborn in her discovery of herself as a woman.  She contemplates descending in to the clear cleansing pool, a ritual we associate with rebirth, and reflects the pure contentment of the moment on her placid face.

    Serenity (Virgin Spring bust)
    563,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3000.00

    Dimensions:

    H 13in x W 7.5in x D 7in

    Weight 15lbs

    "The Blessing Way emphasizes peace, harmony and good."*

    For several years Star has been contributing to the educational expenses of a young Navajo girl orphaned when her father was killed and her mother abandoned her. One summer the girl invited Star to be an honored guest at her Kinaaldeh Ceremony, a puberty ritual that formally initiates a girl into womanhood and assures her long life and happiness. The ceremony was conducted by a Navajo medicine woman whose strength of character and air of quiet power made a deep impression on Star. Precisely what was so extraordinary about this woman was difficult for Star to describe with words, so she tried to capture her presence in bronze.

    In a coincidence that was fortuitous, after Star had completed the piece she came across a passage in a book written in the 1930's by a female archaeologist that did manage to put into words a description of a Navajo medicine woman that was uncannily similar to the sculpture she just finished. "Her face was noble and beautiful. Her black velveteen blouse and wide purple skirt made a pleasing complement to her warm brown skin and black hair. Her hair was streaked with white at the temples and drawn severely back from a high forehead into a large double-knot tied with white cord at the back of her head. From her ears long loops of flexible turquoise beads hung, and around her neck were many valuable strings of turquoise, coral and white shell beads. On her brown and capable hands were silver and turquoise rings and bracelets. Indeed, she looked like the picture of the Queen of Sikkim, the Tibetan princess.... So I beheld this beautiful woman of the red Navajo earth. I could only liken her to an oriental queen. But I thought of Thomas Wolfe's memorable phrase, 'the imperturbable visage of eternity'."

    The Kinaaldeh Ceremony is a part of the Blessing Way, which Navajos say is the backbone of all ceremonialism, controlling all other rites and chants. Used to attract good, avert misfortune and invoke positive blessings, Blessing Way rites fulfill a multitude of needs, protecting livestock, aiding childbirth, blessing a new hogan, consecrating a marriage, protecting soldiers, as well as celebrating a girl's adolescence.

    Blessing Way (Bust)
    900,1173
  •  

    Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,200

     

    Dimensions:
    H 16.6 x L 16 x D 10

    Weight 30lbs
      

    In this sculpture a Plains Indian Woman listens pensively to the voices of her ancestors, whispered to her by the spirit messengers.

     

    An interest in the traditional way of life and thinking of native cultures, and a desire to move beyond the stereotyped image of the "squaw" led Star to read books about American Indian philosophy and spirituality.  Drawing on the legend that the voices of the ancients could be heard through different "mediums", bring visions to those endowed with strong "medicine", she was moved to do a piece that captured this. 

     

    There is an emotional presence, an aura of importance and power to this sculpture that is due in part to the concept that inspired it, but also comes from the strength and dignity of the Woman; herself-the spirit in the bronze.  As she worked on this particular sculpture, however, something deeper came out.  She found a soul emerging that seemed to speak personally to her.

                                       

    Listening Woman (bust)
    486,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 18in x W 10in x D 6in

    Weight 25lbs

     

    Familiarity with the forests and the animals that inhabit it start at an early age among the tribal people of Amazonia.  Children are often given pets to raise as part of the family in order to strengthen their bond with nature, as well as teach them nurturing and responsibility.  These are crucial lessons in an environment like the rain forest, where the balance of use and care are essential to survival.


    "Daughter of the Rainforest" depicts a Kampa Indian child with and suggests not only the fragility of the child, but, in a larger context, her endangered culture, the vanishing rain forests, and our threatened planet.


    It represents an elegy to the past, a testament to the present and a challenge to the future.

    Daughter of the Rainforest
    282,432
  • Bronze Edition of 25.

    Price $ 6,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 27.50in x W 13in x D 18in

    Weight 50lbs


     After meeting some New Zealand Maori who had come to this country to play Polocrosse - a fast and furious horse sport I also enjoy - I decided to visit New Zealand.  While there, I took advantage of the opportunity to talk with contemporary Maori people, to experience their culture and immerse myself in their history.  Perhaps the most striking cultural practice of the Maori that I observed is their tradition of facial tattooing.  Cutting intricate patterns into the flesh with a sharp blade of bone - not pricking, as is the custom elsewhere - and rubbing a pigment of soot and water into the wounds to leave blue-green scars, is an ancient art of theirs - an honor traditionally reserved for men and women of rank and dignity, experience and accomplishment. 

     

    Some of these elaborate markings represent one's family heritage, but can only be worn if the actions and deeds of the wearer have lived up to the high standard set by ancestors.  Other patterns tell of personal accolades and expertise, either in healing powers or battle courage.  What impressed me most, however, was the way in which the patterns, over time, seemed to become external reflections of the internal person...self-expressions rather than mere decorations...that were as natural to the face as age lines.

     

    In this sculpture I wanted to capture the depth of character that comes from an extraordinary life dignified by challenges met and surmounted.

    Once Warriors
    540,720
  • Price: 3000.00
    Edition Size 35
    Dimensions: 15.25 x 8 x 5"
    15lbs.

    In the imagined scene behind this sculpture a young Hopi Maiden gazes serenely across her desert homeland before climbing the steep foot-trail leading to her mesa-top dwelling.  She is dressed in traditional attire for daily work:  a handwoven dress designed to leave the shoulder bare (by 1900 many Hopi women were being encouraged by the government and missionaries to wear a calico slip under the dress so that their arms and shoulders were covered).  Her hair is done up in the large whorls that imitate the squashblossom, the symbol for purity, and identify her as a girl of marriageable age.

     

    Personal investigations into the strange and wonderful culture of the Hopi Indian tribe led Star to try to capture the special quality that the Hopi represent.  Their ancestry is directly traceable to the Anasazi, the oldest known inhabitants of the southwest.  They still live in villages that cling to the six hundred foot high escarpments of three rocky mesas rising abruptly out of the desert plains of northern Arizona.  But it is their world view - deeply spiritual, rich in tradition, close to the natural rhythms of life - that speaks to a felt need in contemporary society, and is what Star kept in mind as she shaped an image that expressed her own felt identification.

     

    As with many of Star's sculptures, she puts her figures in an expressive mode that suggests philosophical content beyond the purely pictorial.  A simple, subtle gesture, in this case, the young woman's clasped hands, reminds us in some elemental way of hands clasped in prayer, and when combined with a facial expression that exudes tranquility and a feeling of satisfaction with self and life, the sum is an almost iconographic representation of peace - which is the meaning of the word "Hopi".  

     

    Desert Blossom
    900,1359
  • The Western Collection
    900,692
  • Range Duty
    Edition Size 15
    Price 63,000.00
    Dimensions 75 x 33 x 44"
    Wieght: 742 lbs 

    Here a stock-man who has come upon a maverick calf while riding the range is trying to start a fire, and as usual the weather is not cooperating. The raindrop spilling from the brim of his hat, the way he uses his coat to shelter the fire, and the application of a dark patina which mutes all colors except the bright yellow slicker - combine to give the feeling that the scene takes place in a windy, drizzly, gloomy afternoon. 

    Star's father is a talented woodworker. As a child she spent many hours working beside him in his basement shop. He would supply her with a board on which she would draw an animal, cut the design out with a jigsaw, and round the edges with a file before painting the piece. She credits the ability to make things with her hands, in part, to his early encouragement. As a tribute to her father's steady patient way of working with the materials at hand, when Star decided to do a sculpture which depicted a cowboy dealing routinely with adverse conditions, yet gleaning a certain satisfaction and serenity from simply doing his job, she drew on her father as both inspiration and model.

    Evident in "Range Duty" is Star's affinity for the quiet contemplative moments that are as much a part of life in the West as dramatic action-packed incidents. Also demonstrated is her concern for details which make the piece authentic. Note the short shank on the branding iron, characteristic of "saddle irons", which are small, light irons, more easily transportable on horseback than branding irons used in the corral. The down-turned angle on the shank of the man's spurs reveals that he is short in stature. Star's ability to get both the look and the feel right is what gives her sculptures a life of their own.

    "The Highest reward for a man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it" 
    ~John Ruskin

    "Every man's work is a portrait of himself"
    ~Anonymous

    "Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing"
    ~Theodore Roosevelt

    "Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. He has a life-purpose; he has found it , and will follow it."
    ~Thomas Carlyle

    Photo Credit: Wendy McEahern



    Star York may reproduce as needed for advertising, web and self promotion, for an unlimited time period. All use must be accompanied by photo credit © Wendy McEahern Photography. Third party use by permission of Wendy McEahern ONLY and subject to licensing fees. ALL OTHER RIGHTS RESERVED
    Range Duty
    900,1317
  • Branding Fire
    Edition Size 35
    Price 1,500.00
    Dimensions 10 x 5.25 x 5.25"
    Wieght: 7 lbs 

    Here a stock-man who has come upon a maverick calf while riding the range is trying to start a fire, and as usual the weather is not cooperating. The raindrop spilling from the brim of his hat, the way he uses his coat to shelter the fire, and the application of a dark patina which mutes all colors except the bright yellow slicker - combine to give the feeling that the scene takes place in a windy, drizzly, gloomy afternoon. 

    Star's father is a talented woodworker. As a child she spent many hours working beside him in his basement shop. He would supply her with a board on which she would draw an animal, cut the design out with a jigsaw, and round the edges with a file before painting the piece. She credits the ability to make things with her hands, in part, to his early encouragement. As a tribute to her father's steady patient way of working with the materials at hand, when Star decided to do a sculpture which depicted a cowboy dealing routinely with adverse conditions, yet gleaning a certain satisfaction and serenity from simply doing his job, she drew on her father as both inspiration and model.

    Evident in "Range Duty" is Star's affinity for the quiet contemplative moments that are as much a part of life in the West as dramatic action-packed incidents. Also demonstrated is her concern for details which make the piece authentic. Note the short shank on the branding iron, characteristic of "saddle irons", which are small, light irons, more easily transportable on horseback than branding irons used in the corral. The down-turned angle on the shank of the man's spurs reveals that he is short in stature. Star's ability to get both the look and the feel right is what gives her sculptures a life of their own.

    "The Highest reward for a man's toil is not what he gets for it, but what he becomes by it" 
    ~John Ruskin

    "Every man's work is a portrait of himself"
    ~Anonymous

    "Far and away the best prize that life offers is the chance to work hard at work worth doing"
    ~Theodore Roosevelt

    "Blessed is he who has found his work; let him ask no other blessedness. He has a life-purpose; he has found it , and will follow it."
    ~Thomas Carlyle

    Photo Credit: Wendy McEahern



    Star York may reproduce as needed for advertising, web and self promotion, for an unlimited time period. All use must be accompanied by photo credit © Wendy McEahern Photography. Third party use by permission of Wendy McEahern ONLY and subject to licensing fees. ALL OTHER RIGHTS RESERVED
    Branding Fire
    900,1350
  • Bronze Edition of 35

    Price  $6,000 4 APS Left

     

    Dimensions
    H 17in x W 14in x D 12in

    Weight 45lbs
      

    Perhaps rising after a night spent camping under the stars or taking a break between ranch chores, this woman pauses to enjoy a hot cup of coffee with her canine companion. There is an especially strong bond that is developed when an animal becomes a working partner that goes beyond the pet/owner relationship; the affection and respect is deepened.

    This cowgirl is almost unconscious in her easy affection for her dog, but her thoughts go beyond that immediate relationship. Her gaze encompasses the entire vista of her world, and it fills her with clarity and deep satisfaction for the place she is now in, both physically and mentally, the place her life choices have led her.

    It has been said that to be a "cowgirl" is a state of mind, grounded yet free . . . connected but not tied, the sense of being an integral part of the natural world. She is at peace with herself and truly content.

     

    Photo Credit Wendy McEahern

     

    Cowgirls
    567,720
  • Price: 5,250.00
    Edition Size 35
    Dimensions: 23" x 17" 10"
    lbs. 50
    Ask about Availibility
    Buffalo Gals & Bill
    900,1394
  • Price: 12,000.00
    Edition Size: 30
    Dimensions 16 x 19 x 14"
    85 lbs

    This sculpture depicts one of those supremely satisfying moments in ranch life.

     

    Springtime in the Rockies is always unpredictable, and a late-season storm has brought bitterly cold temperatures along with two feet of snow.  Concerned because he knows his cows have already begun calving, a rancher's check on the herd has turned into a rescue mission.  Having discovered a calf that became separated from its mother, he is cradling it in his arms and across his saddle, allowing his stout, reliable horse to carry them home.

     

    Combining all the elements that go into the successful raising of cattle in the West, this is a scene that could have taken place fifty or one hundred years ago . . . or yesterday.

    Spring Snow
    900,725
  • Bronze Edition of 35

    Price $ 6000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 27in x W 12in x D 12in

    Weight 45lbs


    This cowboy is in his prime in confidence and physical acuity.
      He has taken on one of the most dangerous sports possible; rodeo bullriding . . . mounting 2,000 lbs. of horns, hooves, muscle, and mean with the intention to stay glued on for 8 seconds;  an ambition that comes from a sense of invulnerability that accompanies proven ability and being familiar with achieving the status of “Number One”. 

     

    Numero Uno
    458,684
  • Price 3600.00
    Edition Size 35
    Dimensions 16.5 x 17 x 9"
    25 lbs

    In this piece we see a little girl riding in her first parade on her father's gentlest mare, and she takes her presentation seriously.  The Purina Mills Company frequently provides the registration cards for these events.  Thus the red-and-white checked square on the card that is their logo and the double zero number appropriate to the entrant.

     

    The spark for this sculpture came during a parade in Winnemucca, Nevada, where Star was participating in a Western Art Show.  After the customary participants had passed by, along with a few unusual ones - Shriners buzzing around in mini-motor cars, and a cowboy who had saddle-broke a longhorn steer - here came a tiny girl of an age and size that should have seen her riding a stick horse, but instead she was seated high on the back of an enormous mare.  What had probably started out as wonderful fun when her father had lifted her up into the saddle and her family had cheered her on, appeared to have long since turned into an ordeal.  Even her hat, too big to begin with, looked like it had gotten heavier and settled on her ears.  But bravely, gamely, she rode on, propped up by her determination to finish.  And although the expression on her face was pouty, she continued to wave and wave.

     

    It is to Star's credit that when children appear in her sculptures they have a personality and integrity unto themselves.  Likewise, her animals are individual.  Many of those who have spent time around horses will recognize the mare in this piece: so large it is intimidating, frisky around adults and headstrong with strangers; but put a child on its back and it seems to sense that it's carrying "precious cargo" and becomes the perfect mount.  In "Purina Princess" we see one of those exciting "firsts" that will be remembered for a lifetime.

    Purina Princess
    900,589
  • Bronze Edition of 35

    Price $ 4,000

     

    Dimensions
    H 16in x W 20in x D 14in

    Weight 25lbs

     

    After a long hard day of plowing, this immigrant farmer has unhitched from the plow and is headed back to the barn.  He pauses, perhaps to assess the day's toil, or to catch the splendor of the setting sun as it casts long shadows over the fields...HIS fields, that will bear the rewards of today's labors.  He may have come to this country in search of freedom, or a new way of life.  Whatever the reasons that brought him, he now stands on his own soil, and he will reap his own harvest, all by his own hand.  In this there is much to be thankful for.

     

    Sun Down
    744,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35

    Price $ 4,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 20in x W 9in x D 9in

    Weight 30lbs

     

    Preparing to perform a feat of daring and skill in a wild west show, this ringlet-tressed cowgirl (c. 1910) slips on her glove with concentration and determination. 

     

    The four playing card markings on her blouse suggest she is about to enter a game of chance in which she is the wild card.

     

    Although this sculpture is not intended to be a portrait-in-bronze of the real Prairie Rose Henderson, who was one of the all-time great bronco and trick riders, it captures the spirit of those early-day cowgirls.

     

    Prairie Rose (Bust)
    431,648
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,000

     

    Dimensions:
    H 13in x W 9in x D 8in

    Weight 20lbs


    With arms akimbo, this cowgirl has drawn the number of the horse she will ride at the rodeo.
     

    Her expression implies her confidence and exuberant love of the sport.

     

    Bronco Belle
    633,720
  • Bronze Edition of 35.

    Price $ 3,000

    Dimensions:
    H 14in x W 5.5in x D 5.5in

    Weight 10lbs


    Never underestimate the pleasant, naïve exterior of any cowgirl awaiting her next competition in the up and coming challenge.
      Preparation practice and rigorous training with the fierce focus would just about knock any cowboy off their horse. 

    The unyielding backbone of the west.

     

     

    Sugar and Spice
    512,680
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